Innovation in stakeholder engagement in research - a Canadian network perspective

Author
Shikako-Thomas Keiko
Author e-mail
Institution
McGill University
Abstract

Introduction: The CHILD-BRIGHT Network is a pan-Canadian network that aims to improve life outcomes for children with brain-based developmental disabilities and their families. The Knowledge Translation Program is developing methods to: better engage stakeholders in research, identify the optimal strategies to communicate research findings, measure the impact of research on clinical, systems, and community.

Patients and Methods: Rapid review of iKT measurement tools and selection in partnership with patients. Longitudinal data collection from all network activities (research projects, programs and services) using a mixed method (quantitative and qualitative) approach to identify barriers and consolidate best practices in stakeholder engagement. Webinars and KT Cafés for research projects looking to further engage the public in the development of their research projects; web-based Community Matching Tool, fostering innovative knowledge translation strategies through annual KT Innovation Incubator competition.

Results: Engagement growth as measured by increased trust and higher levels of engagement in the research process, engagement of patient-partners to develop, evaluate and implement knowledge translation projects in partnership with researchers across Canada, parent mentor program supporting understanding and engagement of parents.

Conclusion: The KT program has started the process of studying how to engage vulnerable populations, such as families in low socio-economic status and other minorities. By measuring trust and direct impacts in the community longitudinally we expect to improve engagement strategies and building the methods infrastructure for a Policy Response Unit, which will identify key policy-makers in childhood disabilities to participate in the design and needs assessments to broaden the scope of stakeholders engaged and possible impacts of our research.

Attached file
Ref. N.
O9301